Novotel Suvarnabhumi Airport Hotel Bangkok

SELECT YOUR BEST ARTISTS ON SILAPIX.COM AND CONTACT THEM DIRECTLY

Art Consulting Thailand l One Stop Art & Design Business Services Bangkok

 

Black White Art Exhibition by Thibaud Tcherchian

 

To kick off a new cycle of exhibits at Novotel hotel at Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok, the gallery Rock Around Asia Art Gallery Bangkok (now Art Consulting Thailand) has invited the French artist Thibaud Tchertchian to exhibit paintings from his series entitled “Blackwhite”. The exhibit will take place in the lobby from May 7th to June 7th, 2014. This series features paint and spray-paint on canvas as a free interpretation of the George Orwell’s predictive novel, 1984. Published in 1949, this science fiction novel presents a futuristic world where society is crushed under the authority of a totalitarian government that controls the media and forbids free expression. The book highlights the dangers of a weakening vocabulary and ideas leading to single thought.

 

Born in 1983, Thibaud Tchertchian became a painter from being a graffiti artist. After exhibiting his first black-and-white series in Paris, entitled “Step One”, the artists has recently moved to Bangkok to paint live portraits against a background of a timeless, blurry city – just like their situation and future. The title “Blackwhite” refers to the brainwashing carried out against dissidents in the novel, trying to make them accept a contradictory reality, that 2 and 2 make 5. “Blackwhite” is an invitation to view a reality while keeping a critical distance. This series was initiated in Thailand and will go on to other countries.

 

Thibaud Tchertchian (1983) works with a black can spray. He sprays the white canvas directly, which allows him to paint with spontaneity and intensity. By erasing colours, he studies lines, gestures and a singular aesthetic quality inherited from graffiti, making his way to a form of expressionism. The white canvas imposes a virgin, neutral style, industrially impeccable, on which a line of black paint is «spit». This rough line suggests an ample and physical gesture that uncovers a figurative form which holds an abstract aesthetic quality. This «spit paint» technique is the result of a long technical study of the handling of the can spray. This technique enables the artist to change the instrument’s primary function, what it produces and what it signifies on the canvas. The artist thus extracts paintings which are sober and romantic at the same time, thoroughly depicting a generational lag.